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Specialists in document retrieval from the South African Government.

This service is for individuals, companies, and professional services - Trusted for over seventeen years.

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* Terms and Conditions at footer below v v

CJF - Terms and Conditions - Nothing to hide>>

CJF acts as an agent on the clients behalf and deals directly with the government departments using the official documentation and regular channels. CJF cannot in any way guarantee that the document required will be recovered, CJF relies on the quality and accuracy of the archiving system within the various government departments. If for whatever reason, CJF cannot recover the documents, the client will be refunded 50% of the advance payment within 60 days of receiving this information, the balance of the fee will be retained as payment for services rendered to that point and costs incurred. The fee charged is an administration fee and covers the following: payment to the department, submission of application, tracking of progress, collection of processed documents, delivery of documents to the applicant. CJF will not be held responsible for the accuracy of the documents provided to it from the department, and will in no way be party to or an accessory to any illegal request, CJF acts in good faith as an agent. The accuracy of the information provided will be the responsibility of the client. No applications will be processed if payment has not been received in full, proof of payment either by fax or email will be sufficient - The applicants name as a reference is necessary. CJF has a discretionary right to proceed with an application even though payment may not have been done in order to speed up the process. The average waiting time for most documents (without complications) is approximately 2 to 4 weeks - this does not include the time that it may take to ship the document to the final destination, this may vary. When the documents have been collected by CJF the documents will be posted registered mail directly to the applicant. Courier fees are additional. CJF clients need to accepts these terms and conditions fully.

 

Testimonials International

"I applied for my birth certificate through CJF from the U.K and received it less than 4 weeks later via DHL delivery. Really excellent service - I would HIGHLY recommend CJF"

                                                      Jane B (London)


"The service I got from CJF was outstanding.  It was clear that trying to sort this from the UK by myself was impossible, and my specific situation provided its own difficulties.  It took the stress out of the process, and I can recommend them 100%."

                                              Arjan V D L (London)


" I can only recommend your service as outstanding!! Thanks again for all your assistance, it has really helped me tremendously!!"

                                                  Kerry P (Mauritius)


"I was out of the country and in desperate need of an unabridged birth certificate. I contacted Michael and with little fuss and in quick time I had received all documentation with an Apostille. I highly recommend this service"           

                                                Timothy P (Portugal)

 

Testimonials South Africa

 

 

This was the best service I have received in years.  Quick response time and I was kept updated every step of the way.  I will recommend this service to anyone!!

                                                      Morne' VZ (JHB)




"I desperately needed a copy of my sons unabridged birth certificate and through searching the Web found CJF company details, I filled in all the necessary forms and when Michael emailed me the invoice. It was within minutes of me sending Michael proof of payment that he sent me the receipt from the department of home affairs. This was receipted on the 27th July and I am very delighted to say that in less than two weeks Michal called to say he has my sons birth certificate. I received exceptional service from Michael and would recommend his company to anyone who is requiring his services.
"
            
                                                     Vanessa C (South Africa)


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  • Verifying your marital status
  • Documents required to enter into a marriage
  • Conducting a marriage


  • Voiding the marriage of a minor


  • Requirements for customary marriages
  • Registering customary marriages
  • Registering more than one customary marriage


  • Requirements for registering a Civil Union
  • Documents required to conclude a Civil Union


 

Preparing to get married

The solemnisation and registration of civil marriages, customary marriages and civil unions are managed by the Department of Home Affairs. Civil marriages are governed by the Marriage Act and regulations issued in terms of the Act. South Africa also recognizes customary marriages through the Recognition of Customary Marriages Act, which became effective in November 2000. Civil unions are recognised in terms of the Civil Union Act (2006).

If you are planning on getting married, you must:

  • ensure that you are legally allowed to marry
  • understand the legal consequences of a marriage, particularly that marriages in South Africa are automatically in community of property, unless a valid ante-nuptial contract has been entered into before the marriage, and
  • make sure that your marriage will comply with all the legal requirements for a valid marriage

Should you be unsure of any of these, legal counsel should be sought before the marriage is entered into.

 

Verifying your marital status

Due to the large number of fraudulent marriages reported to the Department of Home Affairs every year, a facility has been created for you to any time. You will need your South African ID number in order to use this facility.

You can also sms the letter M followed by your ID number (example: M5001010050080) to 32551 A reply sms will be sent back to your cellphone to confirm your marital status and the date of your marriage. The sms’s cost R10 each and will be charged by your network service provider.


Documents required to enter into a marriage

On the day of the marriage a couple must present the following documents to the person officiating at the wedding:

  • Identity documents(for each person getting married)
  • If a foreign national is marrying a South African citizen, they should both present their valid passports as well as well as a completed BI-31 Form (Declaration for the Purpose of Marriage, Letter of no impediment)
  • If the wedding is for a minor (a person under the age of 18 years), the written consent of both parents/ legal guardian or the Commissioner of Child Welfare or a judge should be submitted on Form DHA-32 as well. If the minors getting married are under the ages of 18 for boys or 15 for girls, the written consent from the Minister of Home Affairs will also be required
  • If any of the persons getting married are divorced, then the final decree of divorce should be furnished
  • If any of the persons getting married are widowed, the deceased spouse’s death certificate must be submitted.

 

Conducting a marriage

Only marriage officers authorised in terms of Act No. 25 of 1961 to perform marriages may do so. Presently civil marriages are solemnised at offices of the Department of Home Affairs and at churches (by authorised marriage officers).

A marriage must be conducted in the presence of at least two witnesses in:

  • a church or another building used for religious services
  • in a public office or private house, with open doors
  • in the case of serious illness or injuries, the marriage may take place in a hospital or any concerned facility.

 

Marriage certificates

Two witnesses and the marriage officer must sign the marriage register after the solemnisation of a marriage. Then the marriage officer must issue the parties with a handwritten marriage certificate (BI-27) free of charge.

The marriage officer must then submit the marriage register to the nearest office of the Department of Home Affairs, where the marriage details will be recorded in the National Population Register (NPR).

Any additional abridged copies or unabridged copies of the marriage certificate can be requested by:

  • Completin ck ink and submitting it to the nearest office of the Department of Home Affairs or to the nearest South African embassy, mission or consulate abroad
  • Paying the prescribed fee

d paying the prescribed fees:

  • A vault copy of the register
  • An abridged marriage certificate that is either computer printed or handwritten  

 

Prohibited Marriages

The law states that certain categories of people may not marry. These include:

 

Consent to the marriage of a minor

If you are or your partner is a minor (younger than 18 years) in the care of either your respective parents or a legal guardian, only the parents’/guardian’s written consent (Form DHA-32) is necessary for you to obtain a marriage certificate.

If a parent whose consent is legally required but either cannot be found to grant consent, or is legally incompetent to do so, then an application may be made to a Commissioner of Child Welfare for consent to the marriage.

If your parents and/or a Commissioner of Child Welfare refuse to grant consent for your marriage, you may then apply to a judge of the High Court for consent. The judge will not grant consent unless there is sufficient evidence that the marriage is in the interest of the minor and that prior consent has been unreasonably refused.

In addition to getting consent from the parents or guardian, boys under the age of 18 and girls under the age of 16 may also be required to seek the consent of the Minister of Home Affairs. The Minister may, on application, condone a marriage which required his/her consent but was contracted without such consent.


Voiding the marriage of a minor

A marriage contracted without the legally required consent of the parents or guardian can be made void, in other words, declared null and void by the High Court at the request of the parents or guardian:

  • before the minor turns 21 and
  • within six weeks of the date on which the marriage first came to their knowledge

If you are a minor, you may apply for the dissolution of the marriage:Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000105 EndHTML:0000013480 StartFragment:0000002293 EndFragment:0000013444

Identity documents

 

Travel documents

 

Citizenship

 

Birth certificates

 

Adoption

 

Marriage certificates

 

Death certificates

 

Amendments in ID Books/Birth certificates

 

Consolidated Lists of Tariffs

           

 

General information about South African Identity books / Identity documents

Applying for an ID book for the first time/Documents required

Correcting errors in the ID Book

Re-issuing an ID book

 

 

General information about South African Identity books / Identity Documents

 

An Identity document is important to get as soon as you are eligible (from 15 years of age) as it proves your identity. The green bar-coded Identity book (ID book) is also a legal form of identity when dealing with public and private institutions. There are many occasions when you will be requested to provide a copy of your ID book – for example for access to housing, education and healthcare services; to apply for a driver’s license or a job; when entering into business agreements and even when registering for the Unemployment Insurance Fund.

 

You will also need an identity book to apply for a passport, and visas to work, study or visit friends and family overseas. You will also need your identity book to register to vote in the general and municipal elections.

 

Identity documents are issued to South African citizens or permanent residence permit holders who are 16 years or older. People (including spouses and children) who are working for the South African government or one of its statutory bodies outside of South Africa also qualify to receive South African ID books.

 

You can apply for your ID book at any office of the Department of Home Affairs or any South African mission or consulate overseas. All applications are sent to the Department’s head office in Pretoria. There, your fingerprints will be matched with those already on record or entered into the National Population Register. Your application will then be processed and once issued, your ID book will be forwarded to the office where you made your application for you to collect.

 

You must provide your cellphone number in your application so that you can receive regular updates on the progress of your application by SMS. To get the SMS updates, simply SMS the word “ID” followed by your ID number to 32551. You will be charged R1 for each SMS sent.

 

 

 

Applying for an Identity book / Identity document for the first time

 

First time applicants must submit the following documentation to their nearest Department of Home Affairs office or South African mission or consulate abroad:

 

    Form BI-9, completed in black ink

    A certified copy of your Birth certificate or reference book  or a copy of the old Transkei, Bophutatswana, Venda or Ciskei homelands identity or travel documents

    Two identical, colour  photographs

 

Your fingerprints will be taken by a Home Affairs official and imprinted on Form DHA-9.

If you are a naturalised citizen or a permanent residence permit holder you must attach the following to your application form:

 

    your naturalisation certificate and a copy, which will be certified by Home Affairs

    your permanent residency certificate and a copy, which will be certified by Home Affairs

    your exemption certificate and a copy, which will be certified by Home Affairs

    Form BI-1620, which must be  completed at a Home Affairs office

 

If the permanent residence permit or exemption certificate cannot be furnished, Form BI-829 must be completed for the issuing of a duplicate thereof. If the naturalization certificate cannot be furnished, you must apply for a duplicate prior to submitting the ID book application.

 

 

 

Correcting errors in the ID Document

 

If you get your ID book and there are errors in the personal information contained within, the Department of Home Affairs will replace your ID book free of charge. To apply to correct information in your ID book, simply submit the following to any office of the Department of Home Affairs:

 

    Forms BI-9 and BI-309 completed with the correct information

    Proof  of the error, that shows the correct information e.g.  birth certificate

    Two identical colour photographs

 

 

 

Re-issuing an ID book

 

You can apply to have your ID book re-issued:

 

    If you are married and want to assume the surname of your spouse. You must submit a copy of your marriage certificate, a completed application Form BI-9 and a pay the required fee.

    If you are a woman and want to apply for a new ID in the name of any of your previous surnames, then documentary proof showing you are entitled to use that surname must be provided (i.e. a birth certificate, a marriage certificate, etc) along with a completed Form BI-9. You will also be required to pay a fee for the re-issue.

    If your ID book it has been lost, stolen or damaged

 

You can apply for a replacement by:

 

    Completing Form BI-9 as well if you have not previously submitted your fingerprints

    Attaching additional documents as required (e.g. a marriage certificate if you are married)

    Paying the required fee for the re-issue

 

In the event you lose, damage or have your ID book stolen, you may request a Temporary Identification Certificate (TIC). This can be done at any office of the Department of Home Affairs and is subject to the verification of your fingerprints.

 

 

  • before you turn 21, or
  • within three months after turning 21.

 

Customary Marriages

In South Africa, the definition of a customary marriage is one that is “negotiated, celebrated or concluded according to any of the systems of indigenous African customary law which exist in South Africa”. This does not include marriages concluded in accordance with Hindu, Muslim or other religious rites.

 

Requirements for a customary marriages

For a customary marriage to be recognised as a valid marriage, it has to have been entered into before 15 November 2000.

However, if entered into after 15 November 2000 it must comply with the following requirements:

  • The marriage must be negotiated, entered into or celebrated in accordance with customary law
  • The prospective spouses must be above the age of 18 years
  • Both prospective spouses must consent to the marriage

The parents of a prospective spouse who is a minor must consent to the marriage. If he/she has no parents, then his or her legal guardian must consent. If the parents or legal guardian cannot consent, a Commissioner of Child Welfare can be approached for consent. Where consent is refused by either of the parents, the legal guardian or the Commissioner of Child Welfare, only a judge of the High Court may consider granting consentIf either of the prospective spouses is already a spouse in a civil marriage, a customary marriage cannot be entered into during the subsistence of the civil marriage. A similar provision is also applied to customary marriages entered into from 1 December 1988.

Although there is no restriction on the number of customary marriages that a man may enter into, no further customary marriage may be entered into unless an order of court regulating the future matrimonial property system of his marriages has been obtained.

 

Registering customary marriages

Customary marriages must be registered within three months of taking place. This can be done at any office of the Department of Home Affairs or through a designated traditional leader in areas where there are no Home Affairs offices.

The following people should present themselves at either a Home Affairs office or a traditional leader in order to register a customary marriage:

the two spouses (with copies of their valid identity books and a lobola agreement, if available)

  • at least one witness from the bride’s family
  • at least one witness from the groom’s family
  • and/or the representative of each of the families

In the event that the spouses were minors (or one was a minor) at the time of the customary marriage, the parents should also be present when the request to register the marriage is made.

Customary marriages are registered by completing BI-1699 and paying the required fees. An acknowledgement of receipt BI-1700 will then be issued by the Department.

 

Registering more than one customary marriage

If a male person is already in a customary marriage and wishes to enter into another customary marriage he has to, at his own cost, get a court order from a competent court which will regulate his future matrimonial property system.

It is also possible for a male person who is already in a customary marriage to enter into a civil marriage. They should follow the normal procedure for civil marriages.

 

The Civil Union Act (effective from December 2006) allows anyone – regardless of their sexual orientation – to marry either through a civil union, a civil marriage or a customary marriage.
Civil unions may be conducted by:

  • designated marriage officers for specific religious denominations or organisations
  • designated officers employed by the Department of Home Affairs and the Magistrates’ Courts

At least two competent witnesses must be present at the ceremony.
Requirements for registering a Civil Union

  • Both persons must be 18 years or older to enter into a Civil Union
  •   Both persons may not be already married in terms of any other Act.Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000105 EndHTML:0000013480 StartFragment:0000002293 EndFragment:0000013444

    Identity documents

     

    Travel documents

     

    Citizenship

     

    Birth certificates

     

    Adoption

     

    Marriage certificates

     

    Death certificates

     

    Amendments in ID Books/Birth certificates

     

    Consolidated Lists of Tariffs

               

     

    General information about South African Identity books / Identity documents

    Applying for an ID book for the first time/Documents required

    Correcting errors in the ID Book

    Re-issuing an ID book

     

     

    General information about South African Identity books / Identity Documents

     

    An Identity document is important to get as soon as you are eligible (from 15 years of age) as it proves your identity. The green bar-coded Identity book (ID book) is also a legal form of identity when dealing with public and private institutions. There are many occasions when you will be requested to provide a copy of your ID book – for example for access to housing, education and healthcare services; to apply for a driver’s license or a job; when entering into business agreements and even when registering for the Unemployment Insurance Fund.

     

    You will also need an identity book to apply for a passport, and visas to work, study or visit friends and family overseas. You will also need your identity book to register to vote in the general and municipal elections.

     

    Identity documents are issued to South African citizens or permanent residence permit holders who are 16 years or older. People (including spouses and children) who are working for the South African government or one of its statutory bodies outside of South Africa also qualify to receive South African ID books.

     

    You can apply for your ID book at any office of the Department of Home Affairs or any South African mission or consulate overseas. All applications are sent to the Department’s head office in Pretoria. There, your fingerprints will be matched with those already on record or entered into the National Population Register. Your application will then be processed and once issued, your ID book will be forwarded to the office where you made your application for you to collect.

     

    You must provide your cellphone number in your application so that you can receive regular updates on the progress of your application by SMS. To get the SMS updates, simply SMS the word “ID” followed by your ID number to 32551. You will be charged R1 for each SMS sent.

     

     

     

    Applying for an Identity book / Identity document for the first time

     

    First time applicants must submit the following documentation to their nearest Department of Home Affairs office or South African mission or consulate abroad:

     

        Form BI-9, completed in black ink

        A certified copy of your Birth certificate or reference book  or a copy of the old Transkei, Bophutatswana, Venda or Ciskei homelands identity or travel documents

        Two identical, colour  photographs

     

    Your fingerprints will be taken by a Home Affairs official and imprinted on Form DHA-9.

    If you are a naturalised citizen or a permanent residence permit holder you must attach the following to your application form:

     

        your naturalisation certificate and a copy, which will be certified by Home Affairs

        your permanent residency certificate and a copy, which will be certified by Home Affairs

        your exemption certificate and a copy, which will be certified by Home Affairs

        Form BI-1620, which must be  completed at a Home Affairs office

     

    If the permanent residence permit or exemption certificate cannot be furnished, Form BI-829 must be completed for the issuing of a duplicate thereof. If the naturalization certificate cannot be furnished, you must apply for a duplicate prior to submitting the ID book application.

     

     

     

    Correcting errors in the ID Document

     

    If you get your ID book and there are errors in the personal information contained within, the Department of Home Affairs will replace your ID book free of charge. To apply to correct information in your ID book, simply submit the following to any office of the Department of Home Affairs:

     

        Forms BI-9 and BI-309 completed with the correct information

        Proof  of the error, that shows the correct information e.g.  birth certificate

        Two identical colour photographs

     

     

     

    Re-issuing an ID book

     

    You can apply to have your ID book re-issued:

     

        If you are married and want to assume the surname of your spouse. You must submit a copy of your marriage certificate, a completed application Form BI-9 and a pay the required fee.

        If you are a woman and want to apply for a new ID in the name of any of your previous surnames, then documentary proof showing you are entitled to use that surname must be provided (i.e. a birth certificate, a marriage certificate, etc) along with a completed Form BI-9. You will also be required to pay a fee for the re-issue.

        If your ID book it has been lost, stolen or damaged

     

    You can apply for a replacement by:

     

        Completing Form BI-9 as well if you have not previously submitted your fingerprints

        Attaching additional documents as required (e.g. a marriage certificate if you are married)

        Paying the required fee for the re-issue

     

    In the event you lose, damage or have your ID book stolen, you may request a Temporary Identification Certificate (TIC). This can be done at any office of the Department of Home Affairs and is subject to the verification of your fingerprints.

     

     

 

Documents required to conclude a Civil Union


































































 

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